Part 1

Not found in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name: Dragon Breath Red  Scientific name: Celosia argentea plumosa

Corolla:  number of petals __5___  separate or  fused? _____fused______

Calyx:    number of sepals ___4__ separate or fused?___separate_____

Androecium: number of stamens __3___ separate.

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =__8-12___)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Apocarpous. There were a bunch of carpels all coming off of a single pedicel.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: zygomorphic (irregular)

Additional distinctive features: Interesting petal arrangement. I could not tell if the few flowers on a single pedicel were part of the apocarpous system or not. This flower has a striking red color, which makes sense for its name!

It is on page __272___ in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name________Stonecrop____________  Scientific name: __________Sedum ternatum______________________

Corolla:  number of petals ___5__  separate or  fused? _separate__________

Calyx:    number of sepals _5____ separate or fused?___separate__________

Adroecium: number of stamens __10___ separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =_10____)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

apocarpous. Several pistils clustered together.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: _____This flower is extremely beautiful. The individual flowers bunched together make it look especially magnificent. I know this is a stonecrop, but what exactly which one, I am not 100% sure on.

It is on page __180___ in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name_____Coral Bells__________________________  Scientific name: _______Heuchera hybrid_____________

Corolla:  number of petals __5___  separate or  fused? ________fused___

Calyx:    number of sepals __1 or 2___ separate or fused?____separate_________

Adroecium: number of stamens __5___ separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =__1___)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Unicarpellate. I believe there is only one because it was very hard to find any at all on this flower.

Flower type/ovary position: epigynous w inferior ovary

Flower symmetry: zygomorphic (irregular)

Additional distinctive features: This flower was difficult for me. I was not sure if it is epigynous, but I could only assume so because there was absolutely nothing inside the petals. So I assumed that the ovary would be below the perianth. Also, there were almost no sepals on some of these flowers and only a few of them had 1 or 2. This made me confused because I thought there had to be sepals?

Specific lily not found in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name________Lily_______________________  Scientific name: __________Canna______________________

Corolla:  number of petals __3___  separate or  fused? _____separate______

Calyx:    number of sepals ___3__ separate or fused?____separate_________

Adroecium: number of stamens __5___ separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =_____)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Unicarpellate. Seems like there is one pistil and ovary.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: zygomorphic (irregular)

Additional distinctive features: ____I was able to find lilies in Newcomb’s Wildflowers, however, I could not find Canna lilies. I was not sure if maybe I was looking in the right place? However this is probably one of the most beautiful flowers I saw, with amazing color. The petals look extremely magnificent and soft, and I would love to have one at home!

It is on page _248____ in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name________Perennial Phlox_______________________  Scientific name: _______Phlox paniculata___________

Corolla:  number of petals __5___  separate or  fused? ____separate_______

Calyx:    number of sepals __5___ separate or fused?___separate__________

Adroecium: number of stamens __5___ separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =_____)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Unicarpellate. Seems to only be one carpel per flower.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: This flower was one of the easiest to identify. It looks very stark and has some pretty distinguishing features. This flower also seemed to look the most like the typical flowers we studied in class.

Part 2

Location/Habitat: I found this flower at the Park of Roses here in Columbus. I know what you’re thinking, widflowers at a Park of Roses? But, while there are many planted flowers there, there are also a ton of wildflowers! If you go around by the forest/trail area and the field, you can see a lot of different types of flowers that do not look planted at all! For example, I found this hydrangea just growing as a shrub around a tree in a dirt path away from all the planted flowers. It was a temperate climate.

Scientific/Common Name: Hydrangea arborescens/ Wild Hydrangea

Distinctive Features: This shrub is native from NY to Ohio,  with states of 8 or 10. The leaves are long stalks and are egg shaped, pointed, and toothed. The flowers blossom in early summer!

Other Info: This flower was super cool to see. It really was just growing out of nowhere, completely away from so much. I actually saw this flower as I was trying to find the exit out of the trail!

Location/Habitat: This flower I found growing on the very bottom of a tree. It was nestled on the edge of a trail out by Clintonville. I could barely notice it, just when it caught a glimpse of my eye. The environment was woody, with a temperate climate.

Scientific/Common Name: E. aromaticum/ Smaller White Snakeroot

Distinctive Features: This is similar to white snakeroot, but its leaves are shorter -stalked, short-pointed, and thickish. The leaves are egg shaped, with bright white flowers.

Other Info: I figured this was a snakeroot, but upon consultation with the field guide, I decided it had to be the smaller white snakeroot, because it was so tiny and low to the ground. This flower is native from Massachusetts to southern Ohio!

Location/Habitat: I saw this flower wrapping itself around another shrub on a trail in Clintonville. Super neat! The area was woody with a temperate climate.

Scientific Name/Common Name: Clematis viginiana/ Virgin’s Bower

Distinctive Features: These are vines with 3-7 leaflets and white flowers. The flowers have 4 sepals and small petals. The plants climb by twisting their leaf stalks around supporting vegetation. The fruit is a cluster of feathery hairs called Old Man’s Beard. The 3 leaflets are coarsely toothed. Moist thickets. This flower blooms in summer and fall.

Other Info: This flower was ridiculous to see. It literally curls itself around other vegetation and in the picture you can actually almost see the vine twisting around the shrub I found it on. This flower I saw on a trail right outside the Park of Roses, which has some super neat wild vegetation!

Location/Habitat: I found this flower growing at the base of a tree in the woods behind the Park of Roses. This was definitely a wildflower, as you could see some of it has been afflicted by insects making holes in the leaves. The area was very woody, with a temperate climate.

Scientific Name/Common Name: Impatiens pallida/ Pale Touch-me-not

Distinctive Features: Flowers are about 1′ long dangling from a long stalk. The flowers have a short inward-curved spur at the back. The leaves are egg-shaped, coarsely toothed. Fruit is a plump pod that explodes when ripe (Wow!). Stem succulent, 2′-5′ high. There are yellow flowers, and are broad and hang at a right angle.

Other Info: This flower is crazy! The fruit explodes?! I guess that is why they are called touch-me-nots. This flowers was super short and low to the ground and an amazing thing to see in the wild. It is also really interesting to see how the field guide describes the flowers hanging at a right angle, which you can actually see in the photo I took! Definitely one of the most interesting things I have seen in the field for this class!